A Young Adult's Greatest Fear

A recent study among American young adults showed several things that they consider to be their “biggest problems.” One was neighborhood violence, another was poverty; they mentioned global warming. But the number one concern of this group of young people was...

A Young Adult's Greatest Fear
03February

A Young Adult's Greatest Fear

Written by
in Section Therapeutic News

A recent study among American young adults showed several things that they consider to be their “biggest problems.” One was neighborhood violence, another was poverty; they mentioned global warming.

But the number one concern of this group of young people was the dissolution of families.

In the report on edutopia.org, it states, “Respondents consider the breakdown of the family to be the most pressing issue facing their generation today.” As families are facing more and more problems, it is evident that the toll it is taking on the generation is making its way into their daily lives.

Which is understandable. My parents were not divorced until I was over 30, but it still felt strange to me—even when I’d wanted the divorce. In a sad addition, my own four children are the product of divorce; my step-children are also from divorce, obviously, or I wouldn't get to have them in my life.

It’s a fine line, and a treacherous one. I can’t blame children for wanting their parents to stay together. Mine did. My husband’s did. My little boy cried the day he found out I was moving and he would have two houses to live in. “But I want us all to be together,” he said.

This feeling must not change as they get older, as the young adults now are still citing that as their number one stressor. Do they look into the future, as I have, and wonder if staying married is even possible anymore? Do they think about what they thought their future would be and realize that it can never be quite like that again, for better or worse? Is it the worry over siblings, the uncertainty of two homes, or even having only one, because one of the parents went away?

It’s a frightening prospect at any age, and can certainly hold a young adult back from pursuing their dreams, in all aspects. School, work, travel, relationships—sometimes, more help such as counseling is needed. Sometimes, the parents can work together, married or not, to help their son or daughter move forward emotionally and physically. We know your child can succeed. You know your child can succeed. Somehow, we have to get them to believe that they, themselves, can succeed.

At The Crossroads is a place where young adults can feel safe and secure and get the additional help that they need to move forward in life. To find out more, call us at (866) 439-0354.

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